Pan-European region

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SCP policy packages

Pan-European trends on existing coherent SCP policy packages

While there is progress in the development of policies, tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remain limited

Reporting across the One Planet network identified evident progress in the development of policies, knowledge resources and technical tools supporting the shift to sustainable consumption and production, although their application to foster tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remains limited. The majority of the relevant policies were adopted between 2012 and 2019, with 2016 and 2019 being the peak adoption years.

Most policy interventions are sectoral or stand-alone SCP plans

Overarching policy frameworks, such as national sustainable development strategies, represent only 14 per cent of all policies reported under indicator 12.1.1. Most policy interventions are either sectoral or stand-alone plans for sustainable consumption and production, hindering the potential for overcoming sectoral silos and aligning existing policies and regulations. The development of integrated product policy frameworks using a life-cycle perspective remains rare.

SCP and circular economy strategies offer the right environment for coordinated policy packages

Product policies are often hosted under broader development policy umbrellas such as sustainable development, sustainable consumption and production or circular economy strategies or actions plans, as such umbrellas can offer the right environment for implementing coordinated policy packages and supporting the systemic change needed to transform economies and societies.

Quantifying impact of SCP policies remain a challenge

Monitoring of the implementation of concrete product policy instruments and assessment of their impact remain challenging across regions. Data trends on Sustainable Development Goal indicator 12.1.1 show that countries have difficulty quantifying the impact of their current SCP policies; only 26 per cent of all reported policies had quantifiable targets or measured impacts.

Adopting a value chain approach in product/service design is critical for avoiding siloed interventions. Creating a pre-competitive space where industry, academia and consumers engage can help overcome technological barriers and create innovative cross-sectoral synergies.

SCP agenda is mostly driven within environmental portfolios; inter-ministerial cooperation is key to overcome silos

While some 70 per cent of policies reported under indicator 12.1.1 are considered relevant to other Sustainable Development Goals (such as Goal 9 on industry, innovation and infrastructure and Goal 8 on decent work and economic growth), only 10 per cent are led by a ministry of economic development, finance, planning or trade and industry or by a high-level political body. This signals a siloed approach of an agenda which is mostly driven by national environment authorities.

One factor that characterizes the frontrunners in the adoption of coherent product policy packages is inter-ministerial cooperation. A shift towards sustainable production and consumption patterns requires closer collaboration.

Regulatory mechanisms can trigger innovation and provide clear political orientation

Regulatory mechanisms, such as chemical substance bans required under multilateral environmental agreements, can both trigger innovation and provide clear orientation across the entire government.

Very few policies cover upstream solutions

At the global level, end-of-life treatment of products, solid waste reduction and recycling are the thematic areas that receive the most policy attention. Very few policies cover upstream solutions such as product design and consumer patterns.

In most cases, countries use a combination of instruments (incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes and legal restrictions

In most cases, countries leverage a combination of instruments, including incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes (e.g., voluntary cleaner production policies), standards and legal restrictions (e.g., regulations restricting the use of single-use plastic products).

Opportunities

While there is progress in the development of policies, tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remain limited

Reporting across the One Planet network identified evident progress in the development of policies, knowledge resources and technical tools supporting the shift to sustainable consumption and production, although their application to foster tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remains limited. The majority of the relevant policies were adopted between 2012 and 2019, with 2016 and 2019 being the peak adoption years.

Most policy interventions are sectoral or stand-alone SCP plans

Overarching policy frameworks, such as national sustainable development strategies, represent only 14 per cent of all policies reported under indicator 12.1.1. Most policy interventions are either sectoral or stand-alone plans for sustainable consumption and production, hindering the potential for overcoming sectoral silos and aligning existing policies and regulations. The development of integrated product policy frameworks using a life-cycle perspective remains rare.

SCP and circular economy strategies offer the right environment for coordinated policy packages

Product policies are often hosted under broader development policy umbrellas such as sustainable development, sustainable consumption and production or circular economy strategies or actions plans, as such umbrellas can offer the right environment for implementing coordinated policy packages and supporting the systemic change needed to transform economies and societies.

Quantifying impact of SCP policies remain a challenge

Monitoring of the implementation of concrete product policy instruments and assessment of their impact remain challenging across regions. Data trends on Sustainable Development Goal indicator 12.1.1 show that countries have difficulty quantifying the impact of their current SCP policies; only 26 per cent of all reported policies had quantifiable targets or measured impacts.

Adopting a value chain approach in product/service design is critical for avoiding siloed interventions. Creating a pre-competitive space where industry, academia and consumers engage can help overcome technological barriers and create innovative cross-sectoral synergies.

SCP agenda is mostly driven within environmental portfolios; inter-ministerial cooperation is key to overcome silos

While some 70 per cent of policies reported under indicator 12.1.1 are considered relevant to other Sustainable Development Goals (such as Goal 9 on industry, innovation and infrastructure and Goal 8 on decent work and economic growth), only 10 per cent are led by a ministry of economic development, finance, planning or trade and industry or by a high-level political body. This signals a siloed approach of an agenda which is mostly driven by national environment authorities.

One factor that characterizes the frontrunners in the adoption of coherent product policy packages is inter-ministerial cooperation. A shift towards sustainable production and consumption patterns requires closer collaboration.

Regulatory mechanisms can trigger innovation and provide clear political orientation

Regulatory mechanisms, such as chemical substance bans required under multilateral environmental agreements, can both trigger innovation and provide clear orientation across the entire government.

Very few policies cover upstream solutions

At the global level, end-of-life treatment of products, solid waste reduction and recycling are the thematic areas that receive the most policy attention. Very few policies cover upstream solutions such as product design and consumer patterns.

In most cases, countries use a combination of instruments (incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes and legal restrictions

In most cases, countries leverage a combination of instruments, including incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes (e.g., voluntary cleaner production policies), standards and legal restrictions (e.g., regulations restricting the use of single-use plastic products).

Challenges

While there is progress in the development of policies, tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remain limited

Reporting across the One Planet network identified evident progress in the development of policies, knowledge resources and technical tools supporting the shift to sustainable consumption and production, although their application to foster tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remains limited. The majority of the relevant policies were adopted between 2012 and 2019, with 2016 and 2019 being the peak adoption years.

Most policy interventions are sectoral or stand-alone SCP plans

Overarching policy frameworks, such as national sustainable development strategies, represent only 14 per cent of all policies reported under indicator 12.1.1. Most policy interventions are either sectoral or stand-alone plans for sustainable consumption and production, hindering the potential for overcoming sectoral silos and aligning existing policies and regulations. The development of integrated product policy frameworks using a life-cycle perspective remains rare.

SCP and circular economy strategies offer the right environment for coordinated policy packages

Product policies are often hosted under broader development policy umbrellas such as sustainable development, sustainable consumption and production or circular economy strategies or actions plans, as such umbrellas can offer the right environment for implementing coordinated policy packages and supporting the systemic change needed to transform economies and societies.

Quantifying impact of SCP policies remain a challenge

Monitoring of the implementation of concrete product policy instruments and assessment of their impact remain challenging across regions. Data trends on Sustainable Development Goal indicator 12.1.1 show that countries have difficulty quantifying the impact of their current SCP policies; only 26 per cent of all reported policies had quantifiable targets or measured impacts.

Adopting a value chain approach in product/service design is critical for avoiding siloed interventions. Creating a pre-competitive space where industry, academia and consumers engage can help overcome technological barriers and create innovative cross-sectoral synergies.

SCP agenda is mostly driven within environmental portfolios; inter-ministerial cooperation is key to overcome silos

While some 70 per cent of policies reported under indicator 12.1.1 are considered relevant to other Sustainable Development Goals (such as Goal 9 on industry, innovation and infrastructure and Goal 8 on decent work and economic growth), only 10 per cent are led by a ministry of economic development, finance, planning or trade and industry or by a high-level political body. This signals a siloed approach of an agenda which is mostly driven by national environment authorities.

One factor that characterizes the frontrunners in the adoption of coherent product policy packages is inter-ministerial cooperation. A shift towards sustainable production and consumption patterns requires closer collaboration.

Regulatory mechanisms can trigger innovation and provide clear political orientation

Regulatory mechanisms, such as chemical substance bans required under multilateral environmental agreements, can both trigger innovation and provide clear orientation across the entire government.

Very few policies cover upstream solutions

At the global level, end-of-life treatment of products, solid waste reduction and recycling are the thematic areas that receive the most policy attention. Very few policies cover upstream solutions such as product design and consumer patterns.

In most cases, countries use a combination of instruments (incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes and legal restrictions

In most cases, countries leverage a combination of instruments, including incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes (e.g., voluntary cleaner production policies), standards and legal restrictions (e.g., regulations restricting the use of single-use plastic products).

Business practices

Pan-European trends on existing sustainable design practices

While there is progress in the development of policies, tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remain limited

Reporting across the One Planet network identified evident progress in the development of policies, knowledge resources and technical tools supporting the shift to sustainable consumption and production, although their application to foster tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remains limited. The majority of the relevant policies were adopted between 2012 and 2019, with 2016 and 2019 being the peak adoption years.

Most policy interventions are sectoral or stand-alone SCP plans

Overarching policy frameworks, such as national sustainable development strategies, represent only 14 per cent of all policies reported under indicator 12.1.1. Most policy interventions are either sectoral or stand-alone plans for sustainable consumption and production, hindering the potential for overcoming sectoral silos and aligning existing policies and regulations. The development of integrated product policy frameworks using a life-cycle perspective remains rare.

SCP and circular economy strategies offer the right environment for coordinated policy packages

Product policies are often hosted under broader development policy umbrellas such as sustainable development, sustainable consumption and production or circular economy strategies or actions plans, as such umbrellas can offer the right environment for implementing coordinated policy packages and supporting the systemic change needed to transform economies and societies.

Quantifying impact of SCP policies remain a challenge

Monitoring of the implementation of concrete product policy instruments and assessment of their impact remain challenging across regions. Data trends on Sustainable Development Goal indicator 12.1.1 show that countries have difficulty quantifying the impact of their current SCP policies; only 26 per cent of all reported policies had quantifiable targets or measured impacts.

Adopting a value chain approach in product/service design is critical for avoiding siloed interventions. Creating a pre-competitive space where industry, academia and consumers engage can help overcome technological barriers and create innovative cross-sectoral synergies.

SCP agenda is mostly driven within environmental portfolios; inter-ministerial cooperation is key to overcome silos

While some 70 per cent of policies reported under indicator 12.1.1 are considered relevant to other Sustainable Development Goals (such as Goal 9 on industry, innovation and infrastructure and Goal 8 on decent work and economic growth), only 10 per cent are led by a ministry of economic development, finance, planning or trade and industry or by a high-level political body. This signals a siloed approach of an agenda which is mostly driven by national environment authorities.

One factor that characterizes the frontrunners in the adoption of coherent product policy packages is inter-ministerial cooperation. A shift towards sustainable production and consumption patterns requires closer collaboration.

Regulatory mechanisms can trigger innovation and provide clear political orientation

Regulatory mechanisms, such as chemical substance bans required under multilateral environmental agreements, can both trigger innovation and provide clear orientation across the entire government.

Very few policies cover upstream solutions

At the global level, end-of-life treatment of products, solid waste reduction and recycling are the thematic areas that receive the most policy attention. Very few policies cover upstream solutions such as product design and consumer patterns.

In most cases, countries use a combination of instruments (incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes and legal restrictions

In most cases, countries leverage a combination of instruments, including incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes (e.g., voluntary cleaner production policies), standards and legal restrictions (e.g., regulations restricting the use of single-use plastic products).

Opportunities

While there is progress in the development of policies, tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remain limited

Reporting across the One Planet network identified evident progress in the development of policies, knowledge resources and technical tools supporting the shift to sustainable consumption and production, although their application to foster tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remains limited. The majority of the relevant policies were adopted between 2012 and 2019, with 2016 and 2019 being the peak adoption years.

Most policy interventions are sectoral or stand-alone SCP plans

Overarching policy frameworks, such as national sustainable development strategies, represent only 14 per cent of all policies reported under indicator 12.1.1. Most policy interventions are either sectoral or stand-alone plans for sustainable consumption and production, hindering the potential for overcoming sectoral silos and aligning existing policies and regulations. The development of integrated product policy frameworks using a life-cycle perspective remains rare.

SCP and circular economy strategies offer the right environment for coordinated policy packages

Product policies are often hosted under broader development policy umbrellas such as sustainable development, sustainable consumption and production or circular economy strategies or actions plans, as such umbrellas can offer the right environment for implementing coordinated policy packages and supporting the systemic change needed to transform economies and societies.

Quantifying impact of SCP policies remain a challenge

Monitoring of the implementation of concrete product policy instruments and assessment of their impact remain challenging across regions. Data trends on Sustainable Development Goal indicator 12.1.1 show that countries have difficulty quantifying the impact of their current SCP policies; only 26 per cent of all reported policies had quantifiable targets or measured impacts.

Adopting a value chain approach in product/service design is critical for avoiding siloed interventions. Creating a pre-competitive space where industry, academia and consumers engage can help overcome technological barriers and create innovative cross-sectoral synergies.

SCP agenda is mostly driven within environmental portfolios; inter-ministerial cooperation is key to overcome silos

While some 70 per cent of policies reported under indicator 12.1.1 are considered relevant to other Sustainable Development Goals (such as Goal 9 on industry, innovation and infrastructure and Goal 8 on decent work and economic growth), only 10 per cent are led by a ministry of economic development, finance, planning or trade and industry or by a high-level political body. This signals a siloed approach of an agenda which is mostly driven by national environment authorities.

One factor that characterizes the frontrunners in the adoption of coherent product policy packages is inter-ministerial cooperation. A shift towards sustainable production and consumption patterns requires closer collaboration.

Regulatory mechanisms can trigger innovation and provide clear political orientation

Regulatory mechanisms, such as chemical substance bans required under multilateral environmental agreements, can both trigger innovation and provide clear orientation across the entire government.

Very few policies cover upstream solutions

At the global level, end-of-life treatment of products, solid waste reduction and recycling are the thematic areas that receive the most policy attention. Very few policies cover upstream solutions such as product design and consumer patterns.

In most cases, countries use a combination of instruments (incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes and legal restrictions

In most cases, countries leverage a combination of instruments, including incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes (e.g., voluntary cleaner production policies), standards and legal restrictions (e.g., regulations restricting the use of single-use plastic products).

Challenges

While there is progress in the development of policies, tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remain limited

Reporting across the One Planet network identified evident progress in the development of policies, knowledge resources and technical tools supporting the shift to sustainable consumption and production, although their application to foster tangible changes in practices and measurable impacts remains limited. The majority of the relevant policies were adopted between 2012 and 2019, with 2016 and 2019 being the peak adoption years.

Most policy interventions are sectoral or stand-alone SCP plans

Overarching policy frameworks, such as national sustainable development strategies, represent only 14 per cent of all policies reported under indicator 12.1.1. Most policy interventions are either sectoral or stand-alone plans for sustainable consumption and production, hindering the potential for overcoming sectoral silos and aligning existing policies and regulations. The development of integrated product policy frameworks using a life-cycle perspective remains rare.

SCP and circular economy strategies offer the right environment for coordinated policy packages

Product policies are often hosted under broader development policy umbrellas such as sustainable development, sustainable consumption and production or circular economy strategies or actions plans, as such umbrellas can offer the right environment for implementing coordinated policy packages and supporting the systemic change needed to transform economies and societies.

Quantifying impact of SCP policies remain a challenge

Monitoring of the implementation of concrete product policy instruments and assessment of their impact remain challenging across regions. Data trends on Sustainable Development Goal indicator 12.1.1 show that countries have difficulty quantifying the impact of their current SCP policies; only 26 per cent of all reported policies had quantifiable targets or measured impacts.

Adopting a value chain approach in product/service design is critical for avoiding siloed interventions. Creating a pre-competitive space where industry, academia and consumers engage can help overcome technological barriers and create innovative cross-sectoral synergies.

SCP agenda is mostly driven within environmental portfolios; inter-ministerial cooperation is key to overcome silos

While some 70 per cent of policies reported under indicator 12.1.1 are considered relevant to other Sustainable Development Goals (such as Goal 9 on industry, innovation and infrastructure and Goal 8 on decent work and economic growth), only 10 per cent are led by a ministry of economic development, finance, planning or trade and industry or by a high-level political body. This signals a siloed approach of an agenda which is mostly driven by national environment authorities.

One factor that characterizes the frontrunners in the adoption of coherent product policy packages is inter-ministerial cooperation. A shift towards sustainable production and consumption patterns requires closer collaboration.

Regulatory mechanisms can trigger innovation and provide clear political orientation

Regulatory mechanisms, such as chemical substance bans required under multilateral environmental agreements, can both trigger innovation and provide clear orientation across the entire government.

Very few policies cover upstream solutions

At the global level, end-of-life treatment of products, solid waste reduction and recycling are the thematic areas that receive the most policy attention. Very few policies cover upstream solutions such as product design and consumer patterns.

In most cases, countries use a combination of instruments (incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes and legal restrictions

In most cases, countries leverage a combination of instruments, including incentives, information tools, voluntary schemes (e.g., voluntary cleaner production policies), standards and legal restrictions (e.g., regulations restricting the use of single-use plastic products).

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